How to Stay Creative While Working From Home Posted on | Muse by Clio


A widely shared piece in The New York Times last week repeated a common assertion about working from home: that it makes you more productive, but less creative.

This quote, from none other than Steve Jobs, appeared in the article: “Creativity comes from spontaneous meetings, from random discussions. You run into someone, you ask what they’re doing, you say ‘Wow,’ and soon you’re cooking up all sorts of ideas.”

Without a doubt, in-person interactions have always been central to the creative process in advertising, too. So, how can advertising people stay creative now that we’re all confined at home for the foreseeable future?

We asked a bunch of people in the business how they’re dealing with the new reality. Check out their responses below.

Kelly Fredrickson, President MullenLowe Boston and New York 

Each day of this new reality is an exercise in managing emotions. Within the same hour we can go from “I’ve got this” to “WTF am I going to do now?” I imagine we are all riding the same carnival ride. When I find myself dipping into the WTF space, I think about the things that ground me and find a way back to feeling like I’ve got it. Here are a few items on my checklist:

Start your day off right. Wake up, pause, breathe deeply, and think about the thing you are most grateful for—then start your day. Center yourself before you start looking at your phone, laptop or TV for the latest news.

Be where your feet are! Stay present. Your people and animals need you. It can be overwhelming to deal with the amount of information we are being asked to absorb and action simultaneously.

Love the tribe. It’s always a good idea to tell the people you love, that you love them. I have four group text strings going—they are a mix of support group and comedy club between family, friends and my teams at MullenLowe. My tribe is strong, and we are helping each other manage being creative through life and through work.

Check out the rest of the article on Muse by Clio