Understanding Our Post-Covid World Posted on | MullenLowe salt


Surprise! It’s another blog about Covid. Yes, we know, it’s been talked about to the point of exhaustion. But our world is going to be shaped by the pandemic, and its ripple effects, for years to come. In our previous blog, we discussed five lifestyle trends we expect to see as a result of COVID-19. Now we’re serving you five more, this time exploring trends to inform your reboot, and how communications can bolster them.

If you’re not online, WYD?
Shopping around, whether it’s for a new dress, a job, a phone or a flat, will take place online.

The crisis forced many companies to turn their capabilities and offerings to the online world, meaning that those who weren’t already set up for digital faced serious problems. This impact has been felt in marketing, with 57% of marketers cutting their budgets in offline media. But even when shops do re-open, digital shopping habits built during the outbreak will stick around. Keeping abreast of digital purpose campaigns, communicating sustainability through social media, and making sure your Brand Do is visible online, will position brands best in the new marketplace.

The creative revolution
For once: don’t reduce, reuse or recycle (your ideas).

Brands that put limited creativity into their products, tending to recycle and repackage items year-on-year will lose consumer love in the post-Covid world. Instead, providing unique, interesting experiences and a purposeful point of view after a lack of sensorial exposure will be critical. This is the time to try something bold. Communications agencies that provide problem-solving creativity will lead the revolution.

Resilient transparency & transparent resilience
Like a set of falling dominoes – global players have been exposed for weak supply chains.

The value chain is more important than ever. COVID-19 exposed weaknesses in huge, multinational companies with fragile supply chains coming to the fore. Businesses with sophisticated warehousing, who have invested in streamlining their distribution and logistics, will be at a massive competitive advantage. Being transparent about your supply chain from start to finish will instil brand love and consumer confidence, as people are more keen than ever to know where their products are coming from. Comms will need to work harder to position companies as thought leaders in hot-topic areas such as resilience, transparency and human rights.

End of growth at any cost
It has taken a worldwide crisis for people to truly ‘get’ the SDGs.

The pandemic has highlighted huge inequalities within countries, between regions and around the globe. As such, people are no longer standing for inaction when it comes to addressing these inequalities. It is the year of activism, and everyone is playing a part. The SDGs are finally being recognised for what they truly are – a global business (and personal) imperative – not an aspirational set of goals for some distant future. This will lead to increased investor focus on sustainability post-Covid, especially when it comes to corporate transparency and stakeholder accountability.

Robots are less risky
The “biggest threat to humanity” is now our saving grace.

Prior to COVID-19, the media narrative told us that robots were one of the biggest threats to humanity. The crisis has only sped up the process of digitisation, with lockdown seeing us become more comfortable with the idea of connecting remotely and co-existing with tech. Ironically, then, the fear of robots will likely diminish. COVID-19 will change consumer preference, and people may actually choose to go to a place that has fewer workers and more machines, because they feel they are at lower overall risk. Balancing this in communications to both consumers and employees, who may still feel at threat from tech, will ensure both stay on side.

Hannah Dace, Account Executive, MullenLowe salt

This article was originally published on MullenLowe salt